The Uprooted

by Susan F. Martin
Publisher: Lexington Books
Release Date: 2005
Genre: Political Science
Pages: 294 pages
ISBN 13: 9780739110836
ISBN 10: 0739110837
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle
GET EBOOK
Examines the progress and persistent shortcomings of the current humanitarian regime that are creating the gaps and inefficiencies of agencies to reach entire categories of forced migrants. Recommends policies to improve international, national, and local responses in areas including organization, security, funding, and durability of response.
RELATED BOOKS
The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the American People
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Oscar Handlin
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-12-09 - Publisher: Plunkett Lake Press

“The Uprooted: The Epic Story of the Great Migrations That Made the American People, which won the 1952 Pulitzer for history, was aimed at an audience of general readers in making his case that immigration — more than the frontier experience, or any other episode in its past — was the continuing, defining event of American history. Dispensing with footnotes and writing in a lyrical style, Dr. Handlin emphasized the common threads in the experiences of the 30 million immigrants who poured into American cities between 1820 and the turn of the century. Regardless of nationality, religion, race or ethnicity, he wrote, the common experience was wrenching hardship, alienation and a gradual Americanization that changed America as much as it changed the newcomers. The book used a form of historical scholarship considered unorthodox at the time, employing newspaper accounts, personal letters and diaries as well as archives.” — Paul Vitello, The New York Times “[Oscar Handlin] has charged his pages with poetry and feeling... The Uprooted is history with a difference — the difference being its concern with men’s hearts and souls no less than an event.” — Milton Rugoff, The New York Times “Seldom in our historical literature have we been offered such detailed, realistic pictures of what it meant to come to the New World. The crossing itself, the struggle to make a living in the New World, the problems of housing, social fellowship, religion, adjustment to democracy — a chapter is devoted to each of these. The social and political pressures, the friction and misunderstanding between generations, the awful realization that the adjustment was too great — this reviewer knows of no book that captures these moods and situations with such sympathy and understanding... This is not, in either style or format, conventional or scholarly history... The style is not pedantic or heavy. The author is imaginative, sensitive, understanding. A tremendous amount of research and real depth of understanding lies behind the book.” — Ralph Adams Brown, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science “[S]trong stuff, handled in a masterly and quite moving way.” — The New Yorker “This is a book of fundamental importance. For the first time it attempts to get at the inner meaning of an experience crucial in the development of the United States. It makes the attempt with a back- ground of imaginative research, a perceptiveness, and a literary skill rare in the modern writing of history... no one should attempt serious work in modern American history without fully reckoning with The Uprooted.” — Eric F. Goldman, The Journal of Southern History “Dr. Handlin’s The Uprooted deserves every bit of the praise and honors that have been heaped upon it. Dealing with an important area of American history without deviating from scholarly standards, the author succeeded in penetrating the façade of historical data to reach the drama of the historical process. The book is not only beautifully written and alive with human interest, but also highly pertinent to current social and political events in the United States... [Dr. Handlin] has handled his material magnificently, and every immigrant and descendant of an immigrant — that is, every American — ought to read this book in order the better to understand himself and his ancestors.” — Solomon Grayzel, Publications of the American Jewish Historical Society “[T]he best historical interpretation of the inner meaning of migration.” — John Higham, Pacific Historical Review “Dr. Handlin has discharged his responsibility admirably. An able scholar of immigration history, Dr. Handlin, in the present work... reveals a mastery of historical data and rare insight and understanding of the manifold problems of the immigrant. The book is beautifully written, and many passages are truly moving... Americans would understand their country better if they would read this book and benefit from the humane spirit in which it is written.” — Carl Wittke, The New England Quarterly
The Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 294
Authors: Susan F. Martin, Patricia Weiss Fagen, Andrew Schoenholtz, Kari M. Jorgensen, Lisa Mann-Bondat
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005 - Publisher: Lexington Books

Examines the progress and persistent shortcomings of the current humanitarian regime that are creating the gaps and inefficiencies of agencies to reach entire categories of forced migrants. Recommends policies to improve international, national, and local responses in areas including organization, security, funding, and durability of response.
The Time of the Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 320
Authors: Elie Wiesel
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-12-18 - Publisher: Schocken

Gamaliel Friedman is only a child when his family flees Czechoslovakia in 1939 for the relative safety of Hungary. For him, it will be the beginning of a life of rootlessness, disguise, and longing. Five years later, in desperation, Gamaliel’s parents entrust him to a young Christian cabaret singer named Ilonka. With his Jewish identity hidden, Gamaliel survives the war. But in 1956, to escape the stranglehold of communism, he leaves Budapest after painfully parting from Ilonka. Gamaliel tries, unsuccessfully, to find a place for himself in Europe. After a failed marriage, he moves to New York, where he works as a ghostwriter, living through the lives of others. Eventually he falls in with a group of exiles, including a rabbi––a mystic whose belief in the potential for grace in everyday life powerfully counters Gamaliel’s feelings of loss and dispossession. When Gamaliel is asked to help draw out an elderly, disfigured Hungarian woman who may be his beloved Ilonka, he begins to understand that a real life in the present is possible only if he will reconcile with his past.
The Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: Christina Elizabeth Firpo
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-01-31 - Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

For over a century French officials in Indochina systematically uprooted métis children—those born of Southeast Asian mothers and white, African, or Indian fathers—from their homes. In many cases, and for a wide range of reasons—death, divorce, the end of a romance, a return to France, or because the birth was the result of rape—the father had left the child in the mother's care. Although the program succeeded in rescuing homeless children from life on the streets, for those in their mothers' care it was disastrous. Citing an 1889 French law and claiming that raising children in the Southeast Asian cultural milieu was tantamount to abandonment, colonial officials sought permanent, "protective" custody of the children, placing them in state-run orphanages or educational institutions to be transformed into "little Frenchmen." The Uprooted offers an in-depth investigation of the colony's child-removal program: the motivations behind it, reception of it, and resistance to it. Métis children, Eurasians in particular, were seen as a threat on multiple fronts—colonial security, white French dominance, and the colonial gender order. Officials feared that abandoned métis might become paupers or prostitutes, thereby undermining white prestige. Métis were considered particularly vulnerable to the lure of anticolonialist movements—their ambiguous racial identity and outsider status, it was thought, might lead them to rebellion. Métischildren who could pass for white also played a key role in French plans to augment their own declining numbers and reproduce the French race, nation, and, after World War II, empire. French child welfare organizations continued to work in Vietnam well beyond independence, until 1975. The story of the métis children they sought to help highlights the importance—and vulnerability—of indigenous mothers and children to the colonial project. Part of a larger historical trend, the Indochina case shows striking parallels to that of Australia's "Stolen Generation" and the Indian and First Nations boarding schools in the United States and Canada. This poignant and little known story will be of interest to scholars of French and Southeast Asian studies, colonialism, gender studies, and the historiography of the family.
The Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 464
Authors: Dorit Bader Whiteman
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-10-10 - Publisher: Hachette UK

Whiteman, who escaped from Nazi-occupied Austria with her family, is now a clinical psychologist in New York. Her impassioned, riveting study of the Jews who managed to leave Germany and Austria before Hitler implemented mass executions and death camps is based partly on interviews with 190 escapees. She tells the incredible story of the Kindertransport operation, which took 10,000 Jewish children from Nazi-occupied countries to England by train and ferry. Adolf Eichmann, then an emigration official, disdainfully approved this mass exodus. We learn of the formidable barriers escapees faced in getting out, of horrid or supportive foster homes, of the trauma and pain of being forcibly uprooted. Many escapees endured years of poverty before re-establihsing themselves. Whiteman rejects Hannah Arendt's thesis that German Jews' cultural assimilation led to their political blindness in a "fool's paradise." This is a distinctive contribution to Holocaust literature.
Saga of The Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 44
Authors: Ranga Hari
Categories: Fiction
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-01-01 - Publisher: Manipal Universal Press

This English translation of Visthapanachi Katha, a Konkani Khanda Kavya, depicts the saga of the migration of the Konkani community from Goa to a land far away from home. This collection of poems encapsulates the reign of a colonial power over the region of Goa that began with the entry of the Portuguese in the 16th century. It illustrates the displacement of the Konkani people and their resurgence at Cochin port. The poems describe the transformation of Goa – both culturally and topographically – and the people of Goa who were plundered, displaced, uprooted, and were forced to strip off their culture and identity. The poet is unfolding the tale of his very own ancestors by tracing out these events and graphically portraying the plight of the Konkani people.
Words of the Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Robert A. Rockaway
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-09-05 - Publisher: Cornell University Press

American Jewish leaders, many of German extraction, created the Industrial Removal Office (IRO) in 1901 in order to disperse unemployed Jewish immigrants from New York City to smaller Jewish communities throughout the United States. The IRO was designed to help refugees from persecution in the Pale of Russia find jobs and community support and, secondarily, to reduce the Manhattan ghettoes and minimize antisemitism. In twenty-one years, the IRO distributed seventy-nine thousand East European Jews to over fifteen hundred cities and towns, including Chino, California; Des Moines, Iowa; and Pensacola, Florida. Wherever they went, these twice-displaced immigrants wrote letters to the IRO's main office. Robert A. Rockaway has selected, and translated from Yiddish, letters that describe the immigrants' new surroundings, work conditions, and living situations, as well as letters that give voice to typical tensions between the immigrants and their benefactors. Rockaway introduces the letters with an essay on conditions in the Pale and on early American Jewish attempts to assist emigrants.
The Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 340
Authors: Göran Rystad
Categories: Forced migration
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher: Lund, Sweden : Lund University Press

Books about The Uprooted
The Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 310
Authors: Oscar Handlin
Categories: Acculturation
Type: BOOK - Published: 1951 - Publisher: Boston : Little, Brown

An Atlantic Monthly Press Book.
Oscar Handlin's The Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 71
Authors: Frederic Cople Jaher
Categories: Acculturation
Type: BOOK - Published: 1966 - Publisher:

Books about Oscar Handlin's The Uprooted
The Uprooted
Language: en
Pages: 194
Authors: Esther Appelberg
Categories: Child welfare
Type: BOOK - Published: 1977 - Publisher:

Books about The Uprooted
The uprooted
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Oscar Handlin
Categories: Child welfare
Type: BOOK - Published: 1951 - Publisher:

Books about The uprooted