Worship Civil War and Community 1638 1660

by Chris R. Langley
Publisher: Routledge
Release Date: 2015-10-23
Genre: History
Pages: 202 pages
ISBN 13: 1317289781
ISBN 10: 9781317289784
Format: PDF, ePUB, MOBI, Audiobooks, Kindle
GET EBOOK
This is the first study of the interaction between warfare and national religious practice during the British Civil Wars. Using hundreds of neglected local documents, this work explores the manner in which civil conflict, invasion and military occupation affected religious practice. As Churches elsewhere in Britain and Ireland were dismantled and the country was invaded by a foreign English army, mid-seventeenth-century Scotland provides an important, yet neglected, point of entry in exploring the intersection between early modern warfare and religious practice. The book establishes a fresh way of looking at the conflicts of the mid-seventeenth century. No other study has explored how soldiers were quartered or marched in close proximity to parish worship, how their presence affected worship patterns and how the very idea of conflict in the mid-seventeenth century impacted upon the day-to-day lives of worshippers. Using the signing of the National Covenant in 1638 as its starting point, this perspective emphasises flexibility in religious practice and the dialogue between local communities, religious leaders and troops as a critical element in the experience of war.
RELATED BOOKS
Worship, Civil War and Community, 1638–1660
Language: en
Pages: 202
Authors: Chris R. Langley
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-10-23 - Publisher: Routledge

This is the first study of the interaction between warfare and national religious practice during the British Civil Wars. Using hundreds of neglected local documents, this work explores the manner in which civil conflict, invasion and military occupation affected religious practice. As Churches elsewhere in Britain and Ireland were dismantled and the country was invaded by a foreign English army, mid-seventeenth-century Scotland provides an important, yet neglected, point of entry in exploring the intersection between early modern warfare and religious practice. The book establishes a fresh way of looking at the conflicts of the mid-seventeenth century. No other study has explored how soldiers were quartered or marched in close proximity to parish worship, how their presence affected worship patterns and how the very idea of conflict in the mid-seventeenth century impacted upon the day-to-day lives of worshippers. Using the signing of the National Covenant in 1638 as its starting point, this perspective emphasises flexibility in religious practice and the dialogue between local communities, religious leaders and troops as a critical element in the experience of war.
The National Covenant in Scotland, 1638-1689
Language: en
Pages: 264
Authors: Chris R. Langley
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020 - Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

What did it mean to be a Covenanter?
Philip Skippon and the British Civil Wars
Language: en
Pages: 292
Authors: Ismini Pells
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-03-06 - Publisher: Routledge

Philip Skippon was the third-most senior general in parliament’s New Model Army during the British Civil Wars. A veteran of European Protestant armies during the period of the Thirty Years’ War and long-serving commander of the London Trained Bands, no other high-ranking parliamentarian enjoyed such a long military career as Skippon. He was an author of religious books, an MP and a senior political figure in the republican and Cromwellian regimes. This is the first book to examine Skippon’s career, which is used to shed new light on historical debates surrounding the Civil Wars and understand how military events of this period impacted upon broader political, social and cultural themes.
Battle-scarred
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: David J. Appleby, Andrew Hopper
Categories: Medical
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-07-31 - Publisher: Manchester University Press

Battle-scarred investigates the human costs of the British Civil Wars. Through a series of varied case studies it examines the wartime experience of disease, burial, surgery and wounds, medicine, hospitals, trauma, military welfare, widowhood, desertion, imprisonment and charity. The percentage population loss in these conflicts was far higher than that of the two World Wars, which renders the Civil Wars arguably the most unsettling experience the British people have ever undergone. The volume explores its themes from new angles, demonstrating how military history can broaden its perspective and reach out to new audiences.
Loyalty to the Monarchy in Late Medieval and Early Modern Britain, c.1400-1688
Language: en
Pages: 302
Authors: Matthew Ward, Matthew Hefferan
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-06-30 - Publisher: Springer Nature

This book explores the place of loyalty in the relationship between the monarchy and their subjects in late medieval and early modern Britain. It focuses on a period in which political and religious upheaval tested the bonds of loyalty between ruler and ruled. The era also witnessed changes in how loyalty was developed and expressed. The first section focuses on royal propaganda and expressions of loyalty from the gentry and nobility under the Yorkist and early Tudor monarchs, as well as the fifteenth-century Scottish monarchy. The chapters illustrate late-medieval conceptions of loyalty, exploring how they manifested themselves and how they persisted and developed into early modernity. Loyalty to the later Tudors and early Stuarts is scrutinised in the second section, gauging the growing level of dissent in the build-up to the British Civil Wars of the seventeenth century. The final section dissects the role that the concept of loyalty played during and after the Civil Wars, looking at how divergent groups navigated this turbulent period and examining the ways in which loyalty could be used as a means of surviving the upheaval.
A Companion to the Reformation in Scotland, c.1525-1638
Language: en
Pages: 796
Authors: Ian Hazlett
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-12-13 - Publisher: BRILL

A Companion to the Reformation in Scotland deals with the making, shaping, and development of the Scottish Reformation. 28 authors offer new analyses of various features of a religious revolution and select personalities in evolving theological, cultural, and political contexts.
The Life and Works of Robert Baillie (1602-1662)
Language: en
Pages: 259
Authors: Alexander D. Campbell
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017 - Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

First full study of the life and career of the Glaswegian minister Robert Baillie, establishing his significance and influence
Caritas
Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Katie Barclay
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-01-28 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Caritas, a form of grace that turned our love for our neighbour into a spiritual practice, was expected of all early modern Christians, and corresponded with a set of ethical rules for living that displayed one's love in the everyday. Caritas was not just a willingness to behave morally, to keep the peace, and to uphold social order however, but was expected to be felt as a strong passion, like that of a parent to a child. Caritas: Neighbourly Love and the Early Modern Self explores the importance of caritas to early modern communities, introducing the concept of the 'emotional ethic' to explain how neighbourly love become not only a code for moral living but a part of felt experience. As an emotional ethic, caritas was an embodied norm, where physical feeling and bodily practices guided right action, and was practiced in the choices and actions of everyday life. Using a case study of the Scottish lower orders, this book highlights how caritas shaped relationships between men and women, families, and the broader community. Focusing on marriage, childhood and youth, 'sinful sex', privacy and secrecy, and hospitality towards the itinerant poor, Caritas provides a rich analysis of the emotional lives of the poor and the embodied moral framework that guided their behaviour. Charting the period 1660 to 1830, it highlights how caritas evolved in response to the growing significance of romantic love, as well as new ideas of social relation between men, such as fraternity and benevolence.
The Clergy in Early Modern Scotland
Language: en
Pages: 290
Authors: Chris R. Langley, Catherine E. Mcmillan, Russell Newton
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-06-24 - Publisher: Boydell & Brewer

A nuanced approach to the role played by clerics at a turbulent time for religious affairs.
War, Strategy and the Modern State, 1792–1914
Language: en
Pages: 248
Authors: Carl Cavanagh Hodge
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-11-25 - Publisher: Routledge

This book is a comparative study of military operations conducted my modern states between the French Revolution and World War I. It examines the complex relationship between political purpose and strategy on the one hand, and the challenge of realizing strategic goals through military operations on the other. It argues further that following the experience of the Napoleonic Wars military strength was awarded a primary status in determining the comparative modernity of all the Great Powers; that military goals came progressively to distort a sober understanding of the national interest; that a genuinely political and diplomatic understanding of national strategy was lost; and that these developments collectively rendered the military and political catastrophe of 1914 not inevitable yet probable.
Scotland in Revolution, 1685-1690
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Alasdair Raffe
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-08-07 - Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

Explores the transformative reign of the Catholic King James VII and the revolution that brought about his fall.
Early Modern Political Petitioning and Public Engagement in Scotland, Britain and Scandinavia, c.1550-1795
Language: en
Pages: 122
Authors: Karin Bowie, Thomas Munck
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-12-18 - Publisher: Routledge

This book assesses the everyday use of petitions in administrative and judicial settings and contrasts these with more assertive forms of political petitioning addressed to assemblies or rulers. A petition used to be a humble means of asking a favour, but in the early modern period, petitioning became more assertive and participative. This book shows how this contrasted to ordinary petitioning, often to the consternation of authorities. By evaluating petitioning practices in Scotland, England and Denmark, the book traces the boundaries between ordinary and adversarial petitioning and shows how non-elites could become involved in politics through petitioning. Also observed are the responses of authorities to participative petitions, including the suppression or forgetting of unwelcome petitions and consequent struggles to establish petitioning as a right rather than a privilege. Together the chapters in this book indicate the significance of collective petitioning in articulating early modern public opinion and shaping contemporary ideas about opinion at large. The chapters in this book were originally published in the journal Parliaments, Estates & Representation.